Sep
6
7:00 PM19:00

Dark Gold: Human Shadow & Global Crisis: Presentation & Conversation

Shadow is a necessary first step in both individual and collective healing. It emphasizes and elaborates on the abundant emotional and spiritual treasures that invariably issue from shadow exploration and transformation. Dark Gold challenges us to become courageous enough to be accountable and compassionate enough to love ourselves and the earth community fiercely, even when we feel it will make no difference.

By Carolyn Baker Ph.D.

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Sep
16
9:30 AM09:30

Ollie Boulder Monday Discussions

  • Mountain View United Methodist Church (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Introduction to Jungian Psychology. Topics include Modern vs. Postmodern Theories; Duality and Opposites; Persona; Ego; Shadow; Personal Unconscious; Complex. Registration for Fall Term begins August 5th Ollie Boulder. We’ll refer to chapters 2 and 16-18 of “A Guided Tour of the Collected Works of C.G.Jung” by Robert H. Hopcke.

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Oct
4
7:00 PM19:00

Once and Future Christ: Jung & the Future of Christianity: Presentation & Conversation

Jung recognized that, for some people, Christianity mediates a sustained and energy-giving contact with the unconscious. However, the capacity of Christianity to perform this mediation has been in decline, largely due to a long series of missteps and betrayals by Christian theologians and other church leaders. For Christianity to survive and evolve, Jung felt it needed to seek wholeness by evoking three long-repressed aspects of the godhead: the feminine, matter, and shadow. In the sixty years since Jung made these observations, there is some evidence that Christianity is rising to this challenge, particularly through the voices of Feminist and Queer theologians, but resistance has been fierce. It remains to be seen if this movement will be sufficient to keep Christianity alive and relevant in the 21st century and beyond.

By Bob Bongiovanni

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Nov
1
7:00 PM19:00

Heroes, Heras and Dorothy’s Epic Journey to Oz, The Path of Individuation: Presentation & Conversation

This presentation is centered around Jung’s concept of “Individuation,” also called “Soul Evolution.” The corresponding mythic term for this process is known as “The Hero’s Journey.” We will note the parallels to it in alchemy, the differences between the masculine and feminine models of the journey (Hero and Hera) and unpack the symbolism in some of the mythic versions of the tale. Remember that in the story of Dorothy’s journey to Oz, we find out in the end that this was all a dream! So we will be doing dream analysis of this epic, grand Big Dream as well.

By Sharon L. Coggan Ph.D.

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Feb
7
7:00 PM19:00

Rebirth In An American Cultural Complex: Presentation & Discussion

This presentation first considers the early American experience of rebirth in a new land and its accompanying mythology of violence, conquest and scapegoating.  This is contrasted with an emerging theme of rebirth through relatedness, visible in recent children’s films and in the dreams of individuals. The image of the Indian Hunter, the European colonists’ earliest hero, contrasts with that of a girl child who melts hardened attitudes though feeling values. These can be seen as a pair of opposites reflecting a resurgent cultural complex (Singer & Kimble, 2004). A Jungian perspective can help us trace the movement of the collective psyche in American culture through popular literature, films and dreams.

The explosion of Donald Trump into American collective consciousness has polarized the culture with intense emotion and a push toward extremism. At the heart of Trump’s message is fear and demonization of the other—the immigrant, the person of color, the practitioner of an unfamiliar religion-- who must be eliminated so that “real Americans” can regenerate an imagined past greatness.  Trump’s dizzying rise to power rests upon his ability to appropriate potent mythological images, particularly what cultural historian Richard Slotkin describes as “the myth of the American frontier.” 

Trump is but the current apotheosis of the Indian Hunter, a tough individualist who renews his manhood, his pioneering spirit and his cherished liberty through acts of violence that exploit the land and eliminate the ‘others’ who inhabit it.This is the latest iteration of the myth of the frontier, a potent psychological story that has set American armies marching from the Puritan colonies to Afghanistan.

From a Jungian perspective, the American psyche is in the grip of a resurgent cultural complex, rooted in a mythology of dominance, violence and scapegoating. Slotkin’s seminal study of the frontier myth throughout popular American literature can deepen our psychological understanding of the distinct shape these dark archetypal patterns have assumed in American culture.

A different archetypal pattern is to discover, during the darkest times, new hope in an obscure and under-valued place.  Signs of a compensatory American myth are emerging in a recent stream of highly successful children’s films. Each of these Hollywood productions tells a similar story: a courageous girl or young woman, living in a time of cultural stagnation and environmental crisis, renews the people and restores the land through her ability to relate to what seems profoundly ‘other.’ Typical of these stories is the 2016 Disney animated film, Moana, a narrative of rebirth through relatedness. Psychological themes in this children’s film will be amplified by dreams arising in individuals since Trump’s election, suggesting a possible, more hopeful direction of the collective psyche.

 By Kaitryn Wertz, M.Ed., LMHC, LPC

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Apr
3
7:00 PM19:00

Hestia in a World Turned Inside Out: Presentation & Discussion

According to Marshall McLuhan, each new advance in media technology extends our senses further from our physical bodies and our location in a particular time and place.  In this way it transforms our experience of being human.  The last decade has brought what is perhaps the most profound media revolution in history; we now carry around in our pockets digital devices that enable us to be instantly connected with virtually anyone or anything on the planet.  With the portals of consciousness flung open, the world rushes in to flood our psyches, obliterating our accustomed sense of interiority or self.  With our nervous systems overloaded by digital input, many of us find ourselves in a chronic state of disembodied dissociation and near-psychotic anxiety. In his 2013 film “Gravity,” Alfonso Cuaron presents a terrifying picture of our contemporary condition:  untethered from her spacecraft, Sandra Bullock floats in a black void, nearly annihilated by overwhelming emptiness. The film won Cuaron the Oscar for Best Director and the freedom to choose whatever he wished as a follow-up project.  “Roma,” the film the director chose to make next could not have been more different from the nightmare of cosmic uprootedness presented in “Gravity”; indeed, it is an antidote to that condition.  In it, the director returns to his childhood home in Mexico City and his family’s indigenous housekeeper, Cleo, who was the beating heart at its center.  With her loving devotion to the home and her humble performance of the daily chores, Cleo creates a container for nurturing and sustaining of young life.  What is most remarkable about the film  - aside from its elegiac beauty -- is its reverence for a woman whom the world at large would dismiss as one of the least important people alive. So it was with Hestia, the least heralded of all the Olympian gods, who despite her near invisibility was the first deity ancient people prayed to in beginning any ritual or major endeavor.  Hestia’s sacred fire at Delphi was the spiritual center of the ancient world, and torches lit from it were carried abroad by colonists establishing new settlements. This same sacred flame of Hestia (or Vesta in the Roman world)  served as the center of every private household, keeping those who lived within its walls spiritually connected to the heart of life. The goddess Hestia does not just live in ancient history but in the psyches of modern women and men.  Indeed James Hillman asserts that she may be regarded as the ruling deity of psychotherapy and analysis. “Hearth in Latin is focus, which can be translated into psychological language as the centering attention that warms to life all that comes within its radius,” he writes.  Hestia, is “the soul essence that inhabits anything.” We’ll show film clips from both “Gravity” and “Roma” to explore the condition of the human psyche in the digital age and its potential for restoration via Hestia-like attention and care.  Understanding that a sense of de-centered disembodiment is the prevailing psychopathology of our time, I will argue that the task that falls to us as therapists and as individuals is to restore for our clients and for ourselves a sense of interiority, of subjectivity…that there is somebody home.

By Susan C. Roberts, MS, MA, MSW

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Jun
8
9:00 AM09:00

Workshop: Personal Myth & Transformation

Martha Peacock, PhD. & Catherine McHugh, PhD.

All of us are guided by at least one personal mythology that replays itself over and over in our daily lives, informing our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Most of us are unaware of our inner stories - so much so that our narratives may be living us1 It can be challenging to identify these guiding tales because personal, familial, cultural and archetypal forces influence them. But once we bring our stories to consciousness, we can make choices about how they influence our lives going forward. This can initiate a powerful and transformative process that expands the ways in which we show up in the world and supports the development of our best selves.

In this hands-on, experiential workshop, we'll work to bring our foundational myth(s) into consciousness. Through a series of exercises we'll explore the ways in which stories of the past are shaping our present. This process can be illuminating and empowering, as it can shed light on outdated stories and provide the impetus to embody newer, more relevant narratives of our choosing.

9-4PM with an hour at noon for lunch. Please bring your own lunch.

Community Church of Christ on 2650 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80503

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May
4
9:00 AM09:00

C.G.Jung Institute

Jung Institute, 1776 S. Jackson # 203, Denver, CO 80210

SPRING 2019 STUDY GROUP

Jeff Kiehl, “On Life and Death”

An ongoing monthly seminar providing an in-depth study of the substance of C.G. Jung’s work—the how and why of his ideas, as well as practical applications. Each semester, participants will meet for four sessions under the tutelage of diplomate Jungian analysts. A variety of subjects will be taught, including structure and dynamics of the psyche, complexes and psychopathology, dream interpretation, and archetypes of the collective unconscious. The seminar is open to the general public and it is a prerequisite for application to the Analyst Training Program. Participants must have some background in Jungian psychology and be in analysis at least two hours a month with a diplomate Jungian analyst with membership in the International Association for Analytical Psychology. * **

For further information, call the C.G. Jung Institute303- 831-9209.

Spring 2019 Study Group Instructors and Topics

This season, we will take an in-depth look at Jung’s work with archetypal material in the culture, religion and the stages of life.

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Apr
13
9:00 AM09:00

C.G.Jung Institute of CO

Jung Institute, 1776 S. Jackson # 203, Denver, CO 80210

Ann Ulanov (guest analyst from New York), “Trauma: Suffering and Transcendence”

An ongoing monthly seminar providing an in-depth study of the substance of C.G. Jung’s work—the how and why of his ideas, as well as practical applications. Each semester, participants will meet for four sessions under the tutelage of diplomate Jungian analysts. A variety of subjects will be taught, including structure and dynamics of the psyche, complexes and psychopathology, dream interpretation, and archetypes of the collective unconscious. The seminar is open to the general public and it is a prerequisite for application to the Analyst Training Program. Participants must have some background in Jungian psychology and be in analysis at least two hours a month with a diplomate Jungian analyst with membership in the International Association for Analytical Psychology.

For further information, call the C.G. Jung Institute 303- 831-9209.

Spring 2019 Study Group Instructors and Topics

This season, we will take an in-depth look at Jung’s work with archetypal material in the culture, religion and the stages of life.

Next: May 4 – Jeff Kiehl, “On Life and Death”

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Apr
5
7:00 PM19:00

It's Not Trump, It's the Titans: Presentation & Conversation

The election of Trump directs the collective's attention to the person, and the negatively polarizing figure he presents. By focusing that attention on the individual we forgo the archetypal backdrop--the myth of the Titans---that has provided the fertile ground for his ascendancy and the waters we unconsciously bathe in daily. A greater understanding of the Titans' presence and their affects clues us into today's current social climate of heightened uncertainty, trepidations, and 'normalization' of the unacceptable. And buried within the myth is a glimpse of the shifting future.

By Dr. Mitchell Peritz 

Community United Church of Christ on Table Mesa Drive

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Mar
2
9:00 AM09:00

C.G.Jung Institute of CO

Nancy Ortenberg, “Aion: Images of the Self”

Jung Institute, 1776 S. Jackson # 203, Denver, CO 80210

SPRING 2019 STUDY GROUP

An ongoing monthly seminar providing an in-depth study of the substance of C.G. Jung’s work—the how and why of his ideas, as well as practical applications. Each semester, participants will meet for four sessions under the tutelage of diplomate Jungian analysts. A variety of subjects will be taught, including structure and dynamics of the psyche, complexes and psychopathology, dream interpretation, and archetypes of the collective unconscious. The seminar is open to the general public and it is a prerequisite for application to the Analyst Training Program. Participants must have some background in Jungian psychology and be in analysis at least two hours a month with a diplomate Jungian analyst with membership in the International Association for Analytical Psychology. * **

For further information, call the C.G. Jung Institute 303- 831-9209.

  • This season, we will take an in-depth look at Jung’s work with archetypal material in the culture, religion and the stages of life.

April 13 -Ann Ulanov (guest analyst from New York), “Trauma: Suffering and Transcendence”

May 4 – Jeff Kiehl, “On Life and Death”

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Mar
1
7:00 PM19:00

The Alchemical Yellow in Dreams & Images: Presentation & Conversation

An early 16th century alchemist said, “The yellow dawn is the end of night, and beginning of day, and a mother of the sun.” To these medieval alchemists, color represented the phases of the long process of making gold - a metaphor for the individuation process and the changing nature of consciousness.  The yellow, or citrinitas, is a transition, coming after the blackness of depression and chaos give way to the white of reflective consciousness and calmness. Jung points out that the black, white and red are discussed extensively in alchemical texts, yet the yellow, or fourth color, has fallen by the wayside.  In her talk, Nancy invites you to move into your imagination and explore the experience of this abandoned fourth as manifested in dreams and image.

By Nancy Ortenberg

Community United Church of Christ, 2650 Table Mesa Dr

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Feb
2
9:00 AM09:00

C.G.Jung Institute of CO Study Group

CG JUNG INSTITUTE OF COLORADO

Jung Institute, 1776 S. Jackson # 203, Denver, CO 80210 Conference room B

Mark Palmer, “The Cultural Perspective”

An ongoing monthly seminar providing an in-depth study of the substance of C.G. Jung’s work—the how and why of his ideas, as well as practical applications. Each semester, participants will meet for four sessions under the tutelage of Jungian analysts. A variety of subjects will be taught, including structure and dynamics of the psyche, complexes and psychopathology, dream interpretation, and archetypes of the collective unconscious. The seminar is open to the general public and it is a prerequisite for application to the Analyst Training Program. Participants must have some background in Jungian psychology and be in analysis at least two hours a month with a Jungian analyst with membership in the International Association for Analytical Psychology.

For further information, call the C.G. Jung Institute 303- 831-9209.

This season, we will take an in-depth look at Jung’s work with archetypal material in the culture, religion and the stages of life.

March 2 – Nancy Ortenberg, “Aion: Images of the Self”

April 13 -Ann Ulanov (guest analyst from New York), “Trauma: Suffering and Transcendence”

May 4 – Jeff Kiehl, “On Life and Death”

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Feb
1
7:00 PM19:00

Alchemy: Lecture & Discussion

The goal of this presentation is to introduce the language and ideas in alchemy. It will identify the stages of the process, the substances that react together and the transformation processes that are metaphors for the difficult changes required in therapeutic work, such as mortificatio or death (i.e., a psychological representation of ego death or letting go), putrefactio or decay and purification (i.e., a psychological representation of psychic breakdown) or coagulatio or coagulation (i.e., a psychological coalescing of the ego).  Images from Jung’s alchemical writing will be used as metaphors to illuminate present-day psychotherapeutic practice.

By Stephen Foster, PhD

Community United Church of Christ, 2650 Table Mesa Dr

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Jan
19
1:15 PM13:15

Film & Discussion, Matter Of The Heart

Documentary on the famous Swiss psychoanalyst, Carl Gustav Jung, featuring interviews with those who knew him and archive footage of Jung. ... Carl Gustav Jung, Marie-Louise von Franz, Barbara Hannah. ... Comprehensive documentary on the legendary psychologist and philosopher, Carl Jung.

Boulder Center For Conscious Living (BC3) 1637, 28th St. Boulder 80301

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Dec
7
6:30 PM18:30

Holiday Wine & Cheese & Film Discussion

The  Boulder Friends of Jung Board is hosting a Holiday Wine and Cheese Gathering”  including excerpts from the film: "It's a Wonderful Life" with Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed. James Curtan will facilitate a discussion of the movie through the lens of archetypes throughout the evening. Location: Boulder Center for Conscious Community (BC3) 1637 28th St, Boulder, Colorado 80301

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Nov
2
7:00 PM19:00

Lecture & Discussion

Jim Downton at Community United Church of Christ, 2650 Table Mesa Dr

Individuation is a term that was used by Carl Jung to describe the process of unifying the conscious and subconscious minds, producing a psychologically integrated and balanced personality. Identical conditions or spiritual awakenings are recognized in many religions and cultures under a variety of names. Jim will share his own Individuation path as described in his book, Night Journey. Participants will go through an interactive process that will bring their own Individuation journey into clearer focus. What emerges will be shared and discussed as one of many paths of individuation.

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Oct
6
1:00 PM13:00

Workshop

JAMES HILLMAN on PUER AND SENEX: ARCHETYPES OF YOUTH AND AGE 

$45 for members; $60 for non-members

Video & Discussion with Susan C. Roberts, MSW at Boulder Center For Conscious Community (BC3)

James Hillman gave his tour-de-force lecture “Senex and Puer: An Aspect of the Historical Present” at the Eranos conference in 1967.  It was the “Summer of Love,” and a generation of young people was rising up to challenge the old guard in societies across the world. The paper was Hillman’s challenge to a Jungian establishment he felt had grown too rigid, repressing new ideas and creative possibilities.  In particular he took aim at the Jungian condemnation of the puer as a mother-bound young man unwilling to adapt to the demands of real life, a view he found insulting to his own fiery puer spirit.  To redeem the puer, he “revisioned” it in an archetypal constellation not with the Great Mother as in the Jungian canon, but with the Father – specifically, the senex, or old man.  The puer is the high-flying spirit who disregards practical considerations in pursuit of his creative vision and ideals.  The senex, on the other hand, values tradition and structure and possesses the discipline and grounding necessary to bring ideas into reality. Together, they form the polarity of youth and age, new and old, past and future, which is present within the psyche of an individual at every stage of life and which plays out as well in our personal relationships and on the historical stage in the conflict between generations.

Hillman was to return again and again to the subject of senex and puer. Indeed, it became one of his foundational themes, an essential backdrop to his writings on individuation, soul-making, and pathologizing up to and through such important late works as The Soul’s Code and The Force of Character and the Lasting Life.

               This afternoon workshop will serve as an introduction to this important archetypal complex, with Hillman himself taking the role of lead teacher.  Half of our time will be spent watching video clips from a workshop Hillman gave on the subject in 2010, a year before his death at age 85. A senex now, having lived half a lifetime since writing his puer manifesto, he is a remarkable embodiment of what it means to live out both sides of the polarity and bring one’s daimon down to earth.

Through group discussion and reflective exercises, we will cultivate an appreciation for the archetypes of puer and senex within ourselves.  We will meditate on how both sides of this archetype can be honored and lived thoughout a lifetime so that there may be age in our youth and youth in our age, and we may discover the timeless and universal within the everyday world.

Susan C. Roberts, MSW, first encountered the work of James Hillman thirty years ago when, as a young woman suffering a bad case of New Age spiritual-bypass, she came upon his essay "Peaks and Vales." The essay, along with Hillman's other writings, were to change her life, leading her on a psychological journey down from the mountain-top of spiritual transcendence into the deeper vales of soul-making via ordinary life. Over the years she attended many lectures and workshops with Hillman; she has also taught seminars on Archetypal Psychology and published several articles on the subject for national publications.  She is currently a clinical social worker and Jungian analyst in private practice in Boulder, Colorado.  

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Sep
7
7:00 PM19:00

The I Ching, Seeking A Dragon: Lecture & Discussion

SEEKING A DRAGON, FINDING A MARE: IMAGES, IMAGINATION, AND MEANING IN THE I CHING.  Lecture by Laura Marshall Presents the I-Ching at First Congregational Church

The I Ching brims with images that arise in dreamlike clusters, providing a vivid reflection of the flow between conscious and unconscious mind, and between the mind and the world. This presentation and workshop explore images associated with the Eight Trigrams at the heart of the I Ching, uncovering a rich array of archetypal energies. No previous knowledge of the I Ching is necessary to enjoy and benefit from this event.

How does your topic relate to Jungian psychology?  C.G. Jung acclaimed the I Ching as a method for exploring the unconscious. Whether for scholarly contemplation or divination, acquaintance with the images in the I Ching deepens one’s understanding of the soul’s language in precisely the ways that Jung himself explored.

Laura Marshall is a scholar of global culture and imagination. She has worked as an I Ching consultant, artist, university professor, and radio programmer. She holds a PhD in Mythological Studies from Pacifica Graduate Institute. An ardent student of the I Ching since 1970, Laura has taught classes in the US and Europe. Her many years as a visual artist are evident in her deep affinity with imagery and the process of imagination, which in turn informs her interpretation and teaching.

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Jul
13
7:00 PM19:00

Film & Discussion

The Personal Myth in Turbulent Times at Boulder Center for Conscious Community, 28th Street, Boulder, CO

For our summer film event, BFJ will be hosting a utube film of a lecture by James Hollis, Jungian Analyst, entitled, "The Personal Myth in Turbulent Times." In 1913 Jung asked himself this question: “What is my myth?,” and realized that he could not answer. Can we? First we have to understand what is meant by myth, and then what the question itself means. Why we have to even ask this question is still another question. What is the cultural context in which we raise these questions, and how do our personal journeys intersect with the climate of our time are still other questions. This presentation will raise these questions, offer putative approaches, and challenge the participant to a more thoughtful engagement.   Following the one hour film, we will have time for small group discussions. 

JAMES HOLLIS, PH. D., is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington.   He is also the author of fourteen books, including his recent book, Living the Examined Life.

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The Lumen Naturae: Let There Be Light!
May
4
7:00 PM19:00

The Lumen Naturae: Let There Be Light!

Lecture by John Todd  

Jung was fond of Paracelsus’ term the Lumen Naturae which means “light of nature”. This light or wisdom is revealed to us via dreams and other manifestations of the unconscious. This lecture will focus on the ego’s relationship to Nature, the unconscious, and images that reflect this relationship such as plants and animals in dreams.  The focus will be on the ego’s relationship with the unconscious, a foundational concept in Jungian theory.

John Todd was born and raised in FL, moved to CO w wife and two in children in 2006. Ph.D., from Pacifica Graduate Institute, analytical training with the IRSJA via the CG Jung Institute of Colorado and graduated in 2014. He lives and practices in Evergreen, CO.

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Apr
7
9:30 AM09:30

Workshop: Slender Threads: Invisible Patterns the Shape & Guide Out Lives

It is an audacious notion in this age of science and willful determination that one’s existence is somehow inspired, guided, and even managed by unseen forces outside our control. Whether called fate, synchronicity, or the hand of God, slender threads are at work brining coherence and continuity to our lives. Over time they weave a remarkable tapestry.  Jerry Ruhl considers the role of synchronicity as well as rational planning in shaping contemporary life. What are these slender threads? Being in a particular place at just the right time, meeting someone who steers you in an unforeseen direction, the unexpected appearance of work, money or inspiration. Such patterns give meaning to our experiences. In our modern culture we’re pretending with tremendous skill and deception we are not all that – not the obverse pattern, not the loose threads, and not the connecting links between what is apparent and what is not. Once you recognize the power of the invisible threads you can stop worrying about trying to control everything. This gives life an intensity, a sense of safety, and less worry — if you can learn to carry on these two perspectives at once. In one-dimensional awareness we leave out of everyday consciousness two essential things: 1) Amazing beauty and, 2) a very deep thing, our identity with the total process of being.

Members $45/ Non-Members, $60 First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St. Boulder

 

 
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Feb
17
2:00 PM14:00

Babetts's Feast

Beautiful but pious sisters Martine (Birgitte Federspiel) and Philippa (Bodil Kjer) grow to spinsterhood under the wrathful eye of their strict pastor father on the forbidding and desolate coast of Jutland, until one day, Philippa's former suitor sends a Parisian refugee named Babette (Stéphane Audran) to serve as the family cook. Babette's lavish celebratory banquet tempts the family's dwindling congregation, who abjure such fleshly pleasures as fine foods and wines. Jim Palmer will facilitate a discussion after the film viewing.

Babetts Feast.jpg
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James Hillman Film & Discussion
Jan
13
2:00 PM14:00

James Hillman Film & Discussion

Martha Harrell & Susan Roberts will facilitate a discussion after viewing a part of this Documentary about James Hillman. The emergence of C.G. Jung’s Red Book from years of storage in a Swiss vault has re-kindled interest in active imagination. This method of self-exploration involves actively engaging one’s own imagination in dialogue, through writing, art, or the spoken word. In this DVD, James Hillman —noted author, psychologist, and the first Director of Studies at the Jung Institute in Zurich — introduces the method and delves deeply into the therapeutic value it offers in an increasingly noisy and demanding world.

$10/ $15 pair, BC3, 1637 28th St. Boulder

 

 

 
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